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III GRAND PRIX DE DIEPPE

Dieppe, 26 July 1931.
4 hours race x km (mi) = km ( mi)


No.DriverEntrantCarTypeEngine

Category 1Class up to 1500cc
2Edmond NeboutE. NeboutBugattiT37A1.5S-4DNA - did not appear
4Earl HoweEarl HoweDelage15S81.5S-8
6MuraourMuraourde CoucyDNA - did not appear
8Robert BrunetR. Brunetde CoucyDNA - did not appear
10FlamantFlamantde CoucyDNA - did not appear
12Pierre VeyronP. VeyronBugattiT37A1.5S-4DNA - did not appear
14Mikael AngwerdM. AngwerdBugattiT37A1.5S-4DNA - did not appear
16André VagniezA. VagniezBugattiT37A1.5S-4
18José ScaronJ. ScaronAmilcar1.1S-6
20Jean DelormeJ. DelormeBugattiT37A1.5S-4
22Anne-Cecile Rose-ItierMme. Rose-ItierBugattiT37A1.5S-4DNA - did not appear
24Yves Giraud-CabantousY. Giraud-CabantousCabanDNA - did not appear
26Philippe AuberP. AuberBugattiT37A1.5S-4
28P. ChevallierP. ChevallierChevallier-Ruby
30René MaryR. MaryBugattiT37A1.5S-4
32RochRochBNC-Ruby527
 
Category 2Class over 1500cc
36Stanislas CzaykowskiCount CzaykowskiBugattiT512.3S-8
38Willy LonguevilleW. LonguevilleBugattiT35B2.3S-8DNA - did not appear
40Georges d'ArnouxComte d'ArnouxBugattiT35B2.3S-8DNA - did not appear
42Marcel LehouxM. Lehoux BugattiT512.3S-8
44Max FournyM. FournyBugattiT35C2.0S-8
46Louis ChironAutomobiles Ettore BugattiBugattiT37A1.5S-8DNA - did not appear
48Jean de MaleplaneJ. de MaleplaneMaserati26M2.5S-8
50Charles WersantC. WersantBugattiT352.0S-8
52Diego MunozD. MunozBugattiT352.0S-8
54Philippe EtancelinP. EtancelinAlfa RomeoMonza2.3S-8
56René FerrantR. FerrantPeugeot174S3.8S-4DNA - did not appear
58Harry RaynesH. RaynesVauxhallDNA - did not appear
60"Mlle. Helle-Nice""Mlle. Helle-Nice"BugattiT35C2.0S-8
62L. PesatoL. PesatoAlfa Romeo6C-17501.8S-6
64"Sim Devil""Sim Devil"BugattiT35C2.0S-8DNA - did not appear
66TetaldiTetaldiBugattiT35C2.0S-8
68Boris IvanowskiB. IvanowskiMercedes-BenzSSK7.1S-6
70Charles MontierC. MontierMontier Ford
72Ferdinand MontierF. MontierMontier Ford
74J.-P. WimilleWimille/GaupillatBugattiT512.3S-8



Under Construction

     

     
Entries:

     
Practice:

     
Race:

     

GRID NOT AVAILABLE


     

Results

Pos.No.DriverEntrantCarTypeEngineLapsTime/Status

1.54Philippe EtancelinP. EtancelinAlfa RomeoMonza2.3S-859479.5 km
2.36Stanislas CzaykowskiCount CzaykowskiBugattiT512.3S-859474.9 km
3.4Earl HoweEarl HoweDelage15S81.5S-858471.4 km
4.48Jean de MaleplaneJ. de MaleplaneMaserati26M2.5S-856455.9 km
5.68Boris IvanowskiB. IvanowskiMercedes-BenzSSK7.1S-654440.4 km
6.20Jean DelormeJ. DelormeBugattiT37A1.5S-450406.0 km
7.60"Mlle. Helle-Nice""Mlle. Helle-Nice"BugattiT35C2.0S-850403.9 km
8.62L. PesatoL. PesatoAlfa Romeo6C-17501.8S-649395.5 km
9.16André VagniezA. VagniezBugattiT37A1.5S-448392.7 km
10.70Charles MontierC. MontierMontier Ford46374.1 km
11.72Ferdinand MontierF. MontierMontier Ford39320.7 km
12.28P. ChevallierP. ChevallierChevallier-Ruby36289.7 km
DNF44Max FournyM. FournyBugattiT35C2.0S-836crash
DNF30René MaryR. MaryBugattiT37A1.5S-436crash
DNF74J.-P. Wimille/J. GaupillatWimille/GaupillatBugattiT512.3S-835crash, fire
DNF18José ScaronJ. ScaronAmilcar1.1S-624mechanical
DNF42Marcel Lehoux/JacquinM. Lehoux BugattiT512.3S-817crash
DNF26Philippe AuberP. AuberBugattiT37A1.5S-412crash
DNF66TetaldiTetaldiBugattiT35C2.0S-812crash
DNF52Diego MunozD. MunozBugattiT352.0S-8
DNF50Charles WersantC. WersantBugattiT352.0S-8
DNF32RochRochBNC-Ruby5270mechanical
Fastest lap: Philippe Etancelin (Alfa Romeo) on lap in 3m41.0s = km/h (mph)
Winner's medium speed: km/h ( mph)
A Weather: .
In retrospect:

     





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V° COPPA CIANO

Montenero - Livorno (I), 2 August 1931.
Over 1100cc: 10 laps x 20.0 km (12.4 mi) = 200.0 km (124.3 mi)
Below 1100cc: 8 laps x 20.0 km (12.4 mi) = 160.0 km (99.4 mi)


No.DriverEntrantCarTypeEngine

Class up to 1100cc
2Alfredo CasaliA. CasaliFiat5091.0S-4
4Giorgio LorenziniG. LorenziniFiat5091.0S-4
6Camillo SavelliC. SavelliFiat5091.0S-4
8CapelloCapelloXDNA - did not appear
10Luigi del ReL. del ReFiat-LombardAL31.1S-4DNA - did not appear
12Macarlo BasagniM. BasagniFiat1.0S-4DNA - did not appear
14Giuseppe CioniG. CioniFiat5091.0S-4
16Aldo TerigiA. TerigiSalmson1.1
18Raffaelo LuchiniR. LuchiniX1.1DNA - did not appear
20Luigi PlatèL. PlatèLombardAL31.1S-4
22Eugenio PalumboE. PalumboAmilcar1.1DNA - did not appear
24Antonio FerrandoA. FerrandoSalmson1.1DNA - did not appear
26Albino PratesiA. PratesiSalmson1.1
28Catullo LamiC. LamiX1.1DNA - did not appear
30Domingo GiorgiD. GiorgiLombardAL31.1S-4
32Gerolamo FerrariG. FerrariTalbot-Special7001.1S-6
34Guglielmo PeriG. PeriXDNA - did not appear
36Luigi PremoliCount L. Premoli, Salmson1.1
38Constanzo ArzillaC. ArzillaAmilcar1.1
40Leonardo JeronitiL. JeronitiSalmsonG.P.1.1S-6
42Oddone SegrazziniO. SegrazziniMaserati1.1DNA - did not appear
44Francesco MatrulloF. MatrulloSalmson1.1
46Giuseppe RossiG. RossiFiat5091.0S-4
 
Class over 1100cc
50Clemente BiondettiC. BiondettiMaserati26R1.7S-8
52Pietro GhersiP. GhersiBugattiT35B2.3S-8
54Baconin BorzacchiniScuderia FerrariAlfa Romeo8C-23002.3S-8
56Giuseppe CampariScuderia FerrariAlfa Romeo8C-23002.3S-8
58Achille VarziA. VarziBugattiT512.3S-8
60Luigi FagioliOfficine Alfieri MaseratiMaserati8C-28002.8S-8
62Domenico CeramiPrince D. CeramiMaserati26B MM2.0S-8
64Louis ChironL. ChironBugattiT512.3S-8
66Giovanni "Nini" JonochG. JonochAlfa Romeo6C-1750 GS1.8S-6
68Tazio NuvolariScuderia FerrariAlfa Romeo8C-23002.3S-8
70Amedeo RuggeriScuderia MaterassiTalbot7001.5S-8
72Francesco SeveriScuderia FerrariAlfa Romeo6C-1750 GS1.8S-6
74Raffaello BartolucciR. BartolucciO.M.6652.2S-6
76Renato BalestreroRenato BalestreroBugattiDNS - reserve driver for #78
78Eugenio FontanaE. FontanaBugattiT35C2.0S-8
80 Carlo GazzabiniC GazzabiniAlfa Romeo6C-1750 S2.3S-8
82Guglielmo CarraroliScuderia FerrariAlfa Romeo6C-1750 GS1.8S-6
84Franco CorteseScuderia FerrariAlfa Romeo8C-23002.3S-8
86Gaspare BonaG. BonaAlfa Romeo6C-1750 GS1.8S-6
88Umberto KlingerScuderia FerrariAlfa Romeo6C-1750 GS1.8S-6
90Luigi CastelbarcoCount L. CastelbarcoBugattiT39A1.5S-8
92Piero TaruffiLelio Pellegrini QuarantottiItala752.0S-6
94Raffaello FortunaR. FortunaBugattiDNA - did not appear
96Carlo Di VecchioScuderia MaterassiTalbot7001.5S-8
98Amerigo CalzolariA. CalzolariO.M.665 SSMM2.2S-6
100Guido d'IppolitoScuderia FerrariAlfa Romeo6C-1750 GS1.8S-6
102Domenico CeramiPrincipe D. CeramiMaseratiDNA - did not appear
104Giovanni MinozziG. MinozziBugattiT35C2.0S-8
106Stefano GyulaiCount S. GyulaiAlfa Romeo6C-1500 SS1.5S-6
108Emilio RomanoE. RomanoBugatti
110Renato DaneseR. DaneseBugattiT35C2.0S-8DNA - did not appear
112Apollonio MariniA. MariniO.M.DNA - did not appear
114Georges d'ArnouxG. D'ArnouxBugattiDNA - did not appear
116XXBugattiDNA - did not appear
118RomaniRomaniXDNA - did not appear
120BettoiaBettoiaAlfa RomeoDNA - did not appear
122Giovanni SerraG. SerraXDNA - did not appear
124Secondo CorsiS. CorsiAlfa RomeoDNS did not start
126GianniniGianniniXDNA - did not appear
128Luigi CatalaniL. CatalaniAlfa Romeo6C-1750 GS1.8S-6


Nuvolari wins the Coppa Ciano at Montenero in record time
by Hans Etzrodt
The international motor sport week at Livorno ended with the Coppa Ciano race, which proved to be another classic battle between Alfa Romeo, Bugatti and Maserati. Scuderia Ferrari represented Alfa Romeo with various 8C-2300 models driven by Campari, Nuvolari, Borzacchini and Cortese backed up by a variety of 6C-1750 types for Severi, Carraroli, Klinger and D'Ippolito. Maserati appeared with only one 2800 cc type 26M for Fagioli. Two potent Bugatti 2300 twin-cam models were privately entered by Chiron and Varzi but with factory backing. Besides these top drivers there were another 17 entries, all independents. At the start Varzi and Fagioli had the fastest cars but both soon ran into trouble. That made Nuvolari's life easier in his fight for the lead. Near the end Varzi (Bugatti) established the fastest lap while Chiron (Bugatti) almost caught up with the victorious Nuvolari (Alfa Romeo) on the final lap. Fagioli (Maserati) finished in third place followed by Campari, Varzi, Cortese, D'Ippolito, Taruffi, Castelbarco and Carraroli. The small car class raced concurrently and was won by Premoli (Salmson) ahead of G. Ferrari (Talbot- Spcl.), Matrullo (Salmson), Pratesi (Salmson) and Cioni (Fiat).
The races on the Montenero Circuit near Livorno (Leghorn in English) had been held since 1921. From 1922 onwards a 22.5 km circuit was used, which in 1931 was shortened to 20 km and routed from Ardenza Mare - Montenero - Savolano - Castellaggio - and back to Ardenza Mare. For 1931 the greater parts of the circuit was resurfaced, including the start and finish area after the tram tracks had been removed. The old row of 24 pits was replaced by a new 25-pits complex with a time keepers' stand and new timing display boards above the pits. The old grandstands made way for larger ones. The narrow road circuit still consisted of endless curves with steep up and down slopes.
      The 1931 event was the 11th time that the race was held on the Circuito del Montenero and the organizer named it misleadingly the 11th Coppa Ciano but in reality, 1931 was the 5th Coppa Ciano. The Coppa or trophy was donated by Italian Navy hero Costanzo Ciano for a 1927 Montenero sports car race, which was named after the trophy. The Coppa Ciano name was applied for the second time to the 1928 Montenero sports car race. As of 1929, when the sports car race was dropped from the program, the Coppa Ciano name was assigned to the racecar event for the first time. The races were held annually and 1931 was the fifth running of the Coppa Ciano and the eleventh race on the Montenero circuit.
      The RACI (Royal Automobile Club of Italy) and L'Automobile Club Livorno, staged a motorcycle race the week before the automobile race. The Coppa Ciano race results counted for the Italian Championship. The 20 km circuit had to be lapped ten times by the cars over 1100 cc but the smaller cars up to 1100 cc had to cover only eight laps or 160 km. A special prize was to be provided for the 1500 cc class for scoring in the Italian Championship.
      The total prize money was 215,000 lire of which 183,000 went to the large car class. 100,000 was to go to the victor plus the Ciano Cup, 40,000 lire to second place and the Mussolini Cup, 15,000 and the Livorno Cup to third, 10,000 to fourth, 7,000 to fifth, 5,000 to sixth, 4,000 to seventh and 2,000 to eighth. The first of the small car class received 5,000 lire and a gold medal, the second 3,000 and third 2,000 lire. There were additional prizes for the leader on each lap, totaling 22,000 lire.
Entries:
Most of the renowned European race drivers were at the start for the Coppa Ciano except the Germans, who were busy at the Avusrennen. Ernesto Maserati and Tazio Nuvolari had entered for the German race but then withdrew to be present in Livorno. In the class over 1100 cc, 40 entries were assigned with race numbers. The Scuderia Ferrari entered a total of eight Alfa Romeos. Nuvolari had a 8C-2300 spider Zagato on loan from the factory with the slotted Monza cowl but lacking rear bodywork in Targa Florio configuration with spare wheel behind the barrel tank. Borzacchini had possibly a similar 8C-2300 and for local hero Franco Cortese from Livorno a 8C-2300, likely a Mille Miglia car. Campari had one of the double 6-cylinder 3500 cc type A monoposti on loan from the factory, which he drove only during early practice but then changed to a 8C-2300 borrowed from the factory. Severi, Carraroli, Klinger and D'Ippolito were driving several variations of the Scuderia's 6C-1750 Alfa Romeos. Gazzabini's Alfa was not supercharged; it was a 6C-1750 S which he co-owned with Paolo Cantono. The Bugattis of Chiron and Varzi were not official factory cars and were entered under the drivers' names. Nevertheless, it was an important race for Varzi in his red 2300 twin-cam Bugatti because the race was part of the Italian Automobile Championship. Chiron drove a similar car but painted blue. Fontana had a T35C Bugatti, probably ex-Balestrero who was present as his reserve driver. The Maserati factory only sent a single 2800 cc type 26M for Fagioli with a spare wheel on the right side. Taruffi drove an Itala 75, a supercharged 2-liter car which belonged to Lelio Pellegrini Quarantotti. Besides these drivers there were many additional entries, all independent, with no chance of winning the race. They are listed at the beginning of this report together with the 23 independent cycle car entries in the class up to 1100 cc. Alessandro Silva states that Gerolami Ferrari drove a Talbot Special which was a Bugatti chassis with a 1100cc engine made in Materassi's workshop from Talbot spares.
Practice:
Wednesday was the first official practice from 12:30 to 14:30. The practice times of Corsi (Alfa) were 19m26s and 18m50s, Bertolucci (O.M.) 17m21s and 17m33s, Terigi (Salmson) 20m51s, Ghersi with an Alfa 1750 in 16m50s and Cerami (Maserati) 16m25s. The popular Campari drove the 3.5-liter tipo A monoposto, which had been revised since Monza, and was timed at 15m14s and later 14m39s. The existing lap record, which stood at 14m38.4s, had been established in 1930 by Nuvolari in an Alfa Romeo P2. On account of the shortening and improvements to the circuit better times could be expected.
      Thursday's practice again took place from 12:30 to 14:30 PM. Chiron, Varzi, Nuvolari, Campari and Prince Cerami circled around the track. Varzi was timed at 15m03s, 14m24s and 14m19s. Chiron turned laps of 15m35s and 15m59s. It was the Frenchman's first time at the difficult Montenero circuit and it was obvious that he lacked knowledge about the multitude of twists and ups and downs. Ghersi changed cars, and now in a Bugatti, turned laps at 16m55s and 15m36s. Campari who continued to drive the tipo A monoposto, turned laps at 14m58s, 14m44s and 14m26s. Prince Cerami was timed at 16m08s, 16m flat and 15m52s. Nuvolari drove a 15m26s lap, then followed with 14m27s, 14m13s and 14m08s, beating the times established by Varzi, Campari and Borzacchini. Fortuna drove laps at 17m43s and 17m55s, while Corsi lapped at 18m59s.
      Friday was the third and last day of practice. Many drivers were on the circuit and the following times were established. Nuvolari 14m28s, Count Gyulai 16m05s, Matrullo 17m41s, Lami with the 1100 cc car 19m04s, Chiron 14m48s, Carraroli 16m39s, Fagioli 14m18s, Cortese 14m42s and Severi 15m39s. Varzi was registered three times with laps of 14m13s, twice at 14m02s and once even at 14 minutes flat. Campari turned a lap at 14m37s with the 8C2300 Monza on loan from the factory. Corrado Filippini reported that Campari decided in the last moment not to race the tipo A monoposto during the race for unknown reasons.
Race:
A crowd of over 100,000 witnessed the race, which was attended by the donor of the Cup, Minister of Communications Count Costanzo Ciano di Cortelazzo and Countess Carolina, the Countess Maria Ciano di Cortellazzo, Vincenzo Florio President of the RACI Sporting Commission, the Prince and Princess di Pimonte and other luminaries.
      From 63 entries some drivers did not appear or did not start. Consequently only 42 cars started, 14 in the class up to 1100 cc were present at the start area and behind them 28 large cars over 1100 cc. They were released in groups of three at an interval of one minute between each trio. This system was used as a safety precaution. Although the circuit had been shortened, resurfaced and corners rounded, it was still a very narrow road and difficult for drivers to pass each other. AUTOMOBIL-REVUE reported that the small cars up to 1100 cc started first and took off at 15:30.
  Pole Position
6
Savelli

Fiat

4
Lorenzini

Fiat

2
Casali

Fiat

20
Platè

Lombard

16
Terigi

Salmson

14
Cioni

Fiat

32
G. Ferrari

Talbot Spl.

30
Giorgi

Lombard

26
Pratesi

Salmson

40
Jeroniti

Salmson

38
Arzilla

Amilcar

36
Premoli

Salmson

46
Rossi

Fiat

44
Matrullo

Salmson

At 15:34 when the last of the small cars had left the start area, the long anticipated big cars were to show their mettle.
  Pole Position
54
Borzacchini

Alfa Romeo

52
Ghersi

Bugatti

50
Biondetti

Maserati

60
Fagioli

Alfa Romeo

58
Varzi

Bugatti

56
Campari

Alfa Romeo

66
Jonoch

Alfa Romeo

64
Chiron

Bugatti

62
Cerami

Maserati

72
Severi

Alfa Romeo

70
Ruggeri

Talbot

68
Nuvolari

Alfa Romeo

80
Gazzabini

Alfa Romeo

78
Fontana

Bugatti

74
Bartolucci

O.M.

86
Bona

Alfa Romeo

84
Cortese

Alfa Romeo

82
Cararoli

Alfa Romeo

92
Taruffi

Itala

90
L. Castelbarco

Bugatti

88
Klinger

Alfa Romeo

100
D'Ippolito

Alfa Romeo

98
Calzolari

O.M.

96
Di Vecchio

Talbot

108
Romano

Bugatti

106
Gyulai

Alfa Romeo

104
Minozzi

Bugatti

128
Catalani

Alfa Romeo

The first row of Biondetti, Ghersi and Borzacchini was followed after one minute by Campari, Varzi and Fagioli. The third row consisted of Conte Cerami, Chiron and and Jonoch. Nuvolari started in the fourth row. When the cars returned from the first lap, Varzi and Fagioli were in the lead, next to each other both with the same time of 14m32s. Chiron was doing remarkably well for someone who had never raced at Montenero before. Only 3 seconds slower than Varzi in a similar car and 8 seconds faster than Nuvolari, though the latter may have been held up by slower cars due to his fourth row start. During the lap Severi left the road. Klinger (Alfa Romeo) also retired after the first lap. The top drivers of the three makes had taken the front positions in the following order:
1.Varzi (Bugatti)14m32s
2.Fagioli (Maserati)14m32s
3.Chiron (Bugatti)14m35s
4.Nuvolari (Alfa Romeo)14m43s
5.Borzacchini (Alfa Romeo)14m45s
6.Campari (Alfa Romeo)15m09s

At the end of the second lap, Varzi still held the lead. Nuvolari had moved from fourth into second place, reducing his gap to the leader from 11 to just four seconds with a lap of 14m21s. Chiron remained third and Fagioli fell back to fourth position, while Borzacchini retired with a clutch problem. Campari advanced to fifth, followed by Biondetti, Minozzi, Ghersi, Cortese and Castelbarco tenth.
1.Varzi (Bugatti)
2.Nuvolari (Alfa Romeo)
3.Chiron (Bugatti)
4.Fagioli (Maserati)
5.Campari (Alfa Romeo)
6.Biondetti (MB-Speciale)
7.Minozzi (Bugatti)
8.Ghersi (Bugatti)
9.Cortese (Alfa Romeo)
10.Castelbarco (Bugatti)

After the third lap Nuvolari was battling Varzi for the lead, instigating another battle of the leading Alfa and Bugatti drivers. They were clearly the fastest runners in the race. But a surprising incident brought an end to their fight, when Varzi slowed down and arrived with a flat tire at the pits. The fact that he was forced to drive slowly back to the pits plus the resultant tire change cost him over five minutes and robbed him of a possible victory. Varzi had fallen back to eighth position. Fagioli could not maintain Nuvolari's pace due to a slipping clutch, which made it impossible to keep going at his early pace. Chiron, although driving very well, was not going to endanger Nuvolari. He was just not fast enough similarly Campari, Ghersi, Biondetti and Cortese.
      On the third, fourth and fifth laps Nuvolari made very fast times of 14m16s, 14m15s and finally an amazing 14m08s. So, after five laps Nuvolari was 1m03s ahead of Chiron and about two minutes ahead of Fagioli in third place. After an even faster sixth lap in 14m06s Nuvolari's advantage over Chiron increased to 1m11s and on lap seven his lead had grown by another six seconds. Since he had started only one row behind Chiron, Nuvolari was now ahead of him on the road. The importance of this was that Chiron's pit could give their driver an up-to-date signal of Nuvolari's progress.
      After the eighth lap the Mantuan's advantage grew another four seconds, while Varzi gained fifth position. On the ninth lap, Nuvolari further increased his lead over Chiron while Varzi in fifth place established a new record lap of 14m00.6s, compared with Nuvolari's best of 14m06s. Fagioli held on to third place while Campari maintained fourth ahead of Varzi.
      During the tenth and last lap Chiron produced an absolutely excellent performance considering that he was new at this long twisting circuit. His fastest lap in 14m08.6s helped him to reduce Nuvolari's advantage of 1m31s to just 44 seconds. However, the main reason why Chiron came so close to Nuvolari was that the Mantuan had a small road accident on the tenth lap while coming down from the mountains. He lost valuable seconds as a result of damaging his car and having to slow his pace. The loudspeakers at the grandstand announced that Chiron had just passed Nuvolari coming down from the mountains. The enthusiasm of the Italian public rapidly dwindled away. Possibly the Italian's victory was now in question? But the first place for Nuvolari was not necessarily lost, since he had started one minute behind Chiron. When the Frenchman arrived and passed the finish line, great tension built up with the crowd in anticipation, concerned that Nuvolari would not reach the finish within the one minute. But then, 16 seconds later, there was great jubilation as Nuvolari reached the line as victor still 44 seconds ahead of Chiron, who was an honorable second. Fagioli, who maintained his third position, had to deal with a slipping clutch, but had no problem staying ahead of Campari and Varzi. Biondetti and Ghersi in seventh and eighth position retired as a result of accidents. Cortese held sixth position, while in seventh place was the skillful' D'Ippolito in the first of the 1750 Alfas. Notable were also Fontana, Taruffi, Castelbarco and Carraroli in the next places. However, Fontana was disqualified for being relieved by Balestrero away from the pits, which was a rule violation.
1100cc class:
The 1100 cc small car class, as anticipated, was won by Premoli in the Salmson monoposto. Premoli prevailed despite a rather chaotic race with stops at the pits to change plugs. On the last lap barely half a kilometer from the finish a crash between Premoli and Ferrari during their neck and neck race for first position brought both to a stop. Premoli recovered and finished two seconds ahead of Ferrari in his so-called Talbot 1100, which used a modified 1500 Talbot engine in a 1500 Bugatti chassis. The Roman Matrullo ended up third in a rather old Salmson amongst his opponents with the latest supercharged cars. Pratesi and Cioni were the last finishers in this class.

Results, class over 1100 cc

Pos.No.DriverEntrantCarTypeEngineLapsTime/StatusDiff

1.68Tazio NuvolariScuderia FerrariAlfa Romeo8C-23002.3 S-8102h23m40.8s
2.64Louis ChironL. ChironBugattiT512.3S-8102h24m24.6s+ 43.8s
3.60Luigi FagioliOfficine Alfieri MaseratiMaserati8C-28002.8S-8102h26m48.4s+ 3m07.6s
4.56Giuseppe CampariScuderia FerrariAlfa Romeo8C-23002.3S-8102h27m27.4s+ 3m46.6s
5.58Achille VarziA. VarziBugattiT512.3S-8102h28m56.4s+ 5m15.6s
6.84Franco CorteseScuderia FerrariAlfa Romeo8C-23002.3S-8102h33m32.0s+ 9m51.2s
7.100Guido d'IppolitoScuderia FerrariAlfa Romeo6C-1750 GS1.8S-6102h38m39.0s +14m58.2s
DSQ78Eugenio FontanaE. FontanaBugattiT35C2.0S-810(2h39m10s) disqualified
8.92Piero TaruffiLelio Pellegrini QuarantottiItala752.0S-6102h39m19.4s+ 15m38.6s
9.90Luigi CastelbarcoConte L. CastelbarcoBugattiT39A1.5S-8102h39m36.4s+ 15m55.6s
10.82Guglielmo CarraroliScuderia FerrariAlfa Romeo6C-1750 GS1.8S-6102h42m02.4s+ 18m21.6s
DNF52Pietro GhersiP. GhersiBugattiT35B2.3S-89crash
DNF50Clemente BiondettiC. BiondettiMaserati26R1.7S-89crash
DNF66Giovanni "Nini" JonochG. JonochAlfa Romeo6C-1750 GS1.8S-69
DNF70Amedeo RuggeriScuderia MaterassiTalbot7001.5S-89mechanical
DNF86Gaspare BonaG. BonaAlfa Romeo6C-1750 GS1.8S-69
DNF74Raffaello BartolucciR.BartolucciO.M.6652.2S-66
DNF80Carlo GazzabiniC. GazzabiniAlfa Romeo6C-1750 S1.8S-65mechanical
DNF108Emilio RomanoE. RomanoBugatti5
DNF128Luigi CatalaniL. CatalaniAlfa Romeo6C-1750 GS1.8S-65
DNF98Amerigo CalzolariA. CalzolariO.M.665 SSMM2.2S-64
DNF104Giovanni MinozziG. MinozziBugattiT35C2.0S-83
DNF54Baconin BorzacchiniScuderia FerrariAlfa Romeo8C-23002.3 S-81clutch
DNF62Domenico CeramiConte D. CeramiMaserati26B MM2.0S-81
DNF88Umberto KlingerScuderia FerrariAlfa Romeo6C-1750 GS1.8S-61mechanical
DNF72Francesco SeveriScuderia FerrariAlfa Romeo6C-1750 GS1.5S-60left the road
DNF96Carlo Di VecchioScuderia MaterassiTalbot7001.5S-80
DNF106Stefano GyulaiCount S. GyulaiAlfa Romeo6C-1500 SS1.5S-60
Fastest lap: Achille Varzi (Bugatti) on lap 9 in 14m00.6s = 85.7 km/h (53.2 mph)
Winner's medium speed: 83.5 km/h (51.9 mph)
Weather: sunny and hot.



Results, class up to 1100 cc

Pos.No.DriverEntrantCarTypeEngineLapsTime/StatusDiff

1.36Luigi PremoliCount L. PremoliSalmson1.182h14m03.4s 
2.32Gerolamo FerrariScuderia MaterassiTalbot Special7001.1S-682h14m05.6s+ 2.6s
3.44Francesco MatrulloF. MatrulloSalmson1.182h16m39.8s+ 2m36.4s
4.26Albino PratesiA. PratesiSalmson1.182h16m55.0s+ 2m51.6s
5.14Giuseppe CioniG. CioniFiat5091.0S-482h27m51.0s+ 13m47.6s
DNF2Alfredo CasaliA. CasaliFiat5091.0S-45  
DNF16Aldo TerigiA. TerigiSalmson1.15  
DNF46Giuseppe RossiG. RossiFiat5091.0S-44  
DNF6Camillo SavelliC. SavelliFiat5091.0S-43  
DNF20Luigi PlatèL. PlatèFiat-LombardAL31.1S-42  
DNF40Leonardo JeronitiL. JeronitiSalmsonG.P.1.1S-62  
DNF30Domingo GiorgiD. GiorgiLombardAL31.1S-41  
DNF38Constanzo ArzillaC. ArzillaAmilcar1.10  
DNF4Giorgio LorenziniG. LorenziniFiat5091.0S-40  
Fastest lap: Premoli (Salmson) on lap 7 in 16m14.0s = 73.9 km/h (45.9 mph)
Winner's medium speed: 71.6 km/h (44.5 mph)
Weather: sunny and hot.
In retrospect:
The starting grids, arranged in numerical order, were initially incomplete because race numbers for five late entry drivers could not be verified. With a June 2013 update all race numbers could be confirmed thanks to Alessandro Silva with information primarily from Gazzetta dello Sport. Thereafter we completed the starting grids, adding seven small cars and 11 large ones.



Primary sources researched for this article:
Autocar, London
AUTOMOBIL-REVUE, Bern
Automobile Club Livorno manifestazioni
AZ - Motorwelt, Brno
IL LITTORIALE, Roma
IL TELEGRAFO, Livorno
L'Auto Italiana, Milano
La Domenica Sportiva, Milano
LA STAMPA, Torino
Manifesto by RACI & Moto Club Livorno
Motor Sport, London
MOTOR und SPORT, Pössneck
RACI settimanale, Roma
Tutti Gli Sportz, Napoli
Special thanks to:
Alessandro Silva
Bernhard Völker
Biblioteca Labronica 'F.D. Guerrazzi'
Dott.ssa Alessandra Stoppa



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© 2012 Leif Snellman, Hans Etzrodt - Last updated: 04.06.2014