Logo



xxxxxxxxx

II AVUSRENNEN

AVUS - Berlin (D), 22 May 1932.
15 laps x 19.573 km (12.162 mi) + 831m (0.516 mi) starting straight = 294.426 km (182.948 mi)


No.DriverEntrantCarTypeEngine

31Manfred von BrauchitschM. v.BrauchitschMercedes-BenzSSKL7.1S-6
32Heinrich-Joachim von MorgenGerman Bugatti TeamBugattiT512.3S-8
33Rudolf CaracciolaR. CaracciolaAlfa RomeoMonza2.3S-8
34Ernst KotteE. KotteMaserati26M2.5S-8
35"Tim" BirkinSir Henry BirkinBentleySpecial4.5S-4DNA - did not appear
36"Williams""Williams"BugattiT512.3S-8
37Hermann zu LeiningenGerman Bugatti TeamBugattiT35C2.0S-8
38Georg-Christian LobkowiczG. C. LobkowiczBugattiT545.0S-8
39Malcolm CampbellSir Malcolm CampbellSunbeamTiger4.0V-12
40René DreyfusOfficine A. MaseratiMaseratiV55.02x8
41Luigi FagioliOfficine A. MaseratiMaserati8C 28002.8S-8
42Hans StuberH. StuberBugattiT512.3S-8
43Hans StuckH. StuckMercedes-BenzSSKL7.1S-6
44Hans LewyPilesi Renn TeamBugattiT512.3S-8
45Juan ZanelliJ. ZanelliAlfa RomeoMonza2.3S-8DNA - did not appear
46Albert DivoAutomobiles E. BugattiBugattiT545.0S-8
47Guy BouriatAutomobiles E. BugattiBugattiT512.3S-8
48László HartmannL. HartmannBugattiT35B2.3S-8
Ernesto MaseratiOfficine A. MaseratiMaseratiV55.02x8DNS - did not start
Louis ChironAutomobiles E. BugattiBugattiT545.0S-8DNS - did not start
Achille VarziAutomobiles E. BugattiBugattiT545.0S-8DNS - did not start
Charly JellenC. JellenBugattiDNA - did not appear
Tazio NuvolariS.A. Alfa RomeoAlfa RomeoMonza2.3S-8DNA - did not appear


Manfred von Brauchitsch surprised at the international Avusrennen in Berlin.
by Hans Etzrodt
From the elite of 16 international drivers only five finished at this fastest high-speed race in Europe. Dreyfus was the first leader and had to stop his 16-cylinder Maserati after lap one. Divo in the 5-liter Bugatti then held the lead until lap five when his engine started leaking oil badly. World record holder Sir Malcolm Campbell in the 4-liter V-12 Sunbeam also retired early. From lap six onwards Caracciola with his 2.3-liter Alfa Romeo was in front. The young German von Brauchitsch in his strange looking streamlined 7.1-liter Mercedes-Benz SSKL followed closely. This duo provided an exciting battle for the lead until the end when von Brauchitsch came out on top as a surprising winner. Behind Caracciola were the Swiss Stuber (Bugatti) in third place, then the Germans Stuck (Mercedes-Benz SSKL) and Kotte (2.5-liter Maserati). Chiron and Varzi were not allowed to start. The remaining drivers all retired their cars, which did not hold up in this high-speed chase. Lewy (Bugatti) crashed on lap one, as did Czechoslovakian driver Prince Lobkowicz who died shortly thereafter in hospital.
In 1931, after an interruption of five years, the ADAC (Allgemeiner Deutscher Automobil-Club) had once again staged an automobile race on the Avus at Berlin. The success of this event had surpassed all expectations and reassured the organizer to risk another race for 1932, although the economic conditions in Germany were not encouraging. The Avus could lay claim to the fastest automobile race in Europe. In 1931 the cars were racing along the open stretch at speeds of 230 km/h. On no other track were there such exceptionally high speeds as in Berlin, where the long Avus straights made such speeds possible. The circuit served both as an automobile test track and as a connecting road between Berlin and Potsdam, comprising two 9.5 km long parallel straights joined at the Potsdam end by the slightly banked South Loop and at the Berlin end in the North by a 180-degree flat bend. Only at these two turns did the drivers have to slow their speed to 70 or 80 km/h, otherwise they could get going at maximum speed on the two very long stretches. As a result tires were always of particular concern at the Avus. The previous year several drivers had had problems with their tires.
      The event was again split into two separate races; Race 1, Class F-J racecars up to 1500 cc, which had to complete 10 laps or 195.561 km and Race 2, Class A-E racecars over 1500 cc, which had to do 15 laps equal to 294.426 km. The 1931 race had been won by Rudolf Caracciola (Mercedes-Benz) when he completed the 15 laps in 1h35m07.6s at an average speed of 185.705 km/h. For 1932 a special prize of 1,000 Reichsmark was donated by Dr. Fritz Opel for the fastest lap. The winner of the Avusrennen was to receive 7,000 Reichsmark. The second-place finisher would receive 3,000 RM, the third 2,000 RM, fourth 1,000 RM, fifth 800RM and sixth 400 RM.
Entries:
By April 26 the race secretary of the ADAC had already received 12 entries for racecars over 1500 cc and that grew to 17 entries by the middle of May. Ernst Henne, the fastest motorcycle rider in the world, was to open race day with some demo laps of his own. The first entry was the 270 hp Mercedes-Benz SSKL of Manfred von Brauchitsch, the same car that he had raced here the year before except it was now equipped with an ugly but effective streamlined body, painted silver, and built speedily in two weeks by Vetter in Cannstatt. The German designer Baron Reinhard Koenig-Fachsenfeld hoped that the aerodynamic improvements would increase the speed of the car by about 20 km/h to a calculated top speed of over 230 km/h, which would be equivalent to an increase of about 80 hp. The car was last year's SSKL and belonged to Baron von Zimmermann, who had sponsored von Brauchitsch since 1929. However, Daimler-Benz through Alfred Neubauer gave indirect support by performing a quick reconditioning of the engine and a new rear axle. This was not an official works entry because the Stuttgart factory management had decided not to support racing in 1932 due to the grave economic situation. Another Mercedes-Benz was driven by Hans Stuck, also a 7.1-liter SSKL, modified with a streamlined tail section. Stuck likewise was privately sponsored with minor support by the factory in the form of advise and help again from Alfred Neubauer. The famous Berlin driver Heinrich-Joachim von Morgen arrived with a white 2.3-liter Bugatti T51. He had returned his 5-liter Bugatti T54 to Molsheim, which he had raced at Tunis but had encountered various mechanical problems with this machine. The Type 51 was not as fast but substantially more reliable. At the Rome Grand Prix he was able to finish third with this car behind Fagioli and Taruffi, despite tire problems. Rudolf Caracciola, who had been hired for 1932 as a works driver for SA Alfa Romeo, appeared in a white Alfa Romeo Monza with a red radiator cowl and he also tried a second Monza, which was red. Ernst Kotte with his white 2.5-liter Maserati 26M was another German, as were Hermann Prinz zu Leiningen with his white 2.0-liter Bugatti and Hans Lewy in the latest 2.3-liter white Bugatti T51, both independent drivers. The Swiss Hans Stuber also arrived with a Bugatti T51, with a white body and red hood, while the Hungarian László Hartmann showed up with a red-white-green 2.3-liter Bugatti T35B. The Czechoslovakian Prince Georg-Christian Lobkowicz just recently purchased one of the 5-liter Bugattis which he entered here for the first time, painted white and blue in the Czechoslovakian colors.
      Automobiles E. Bugatti works entries were received for Louis Chiron and Achille Varzi with Albert Divo and Guy Bouriat in reserve with the 5-liter Bugatti T54 and 2.3-liter T51. "Williams" came as an independent driver in a 2.3-liter Bugatti T51. Officine A. Maserati had originally entered two cars for Ernesto Maserati and René Dreyfus. During practice and the race Dreyfus drove the 16-cylinder car capable of over 260 km/h top speed and Luigi Fagioli the 2.8-liter 26M. Ernesto Maserati, who now managed the factory business, had decided that he should no longer race after the death of his brother Alfiero. He also wanted Dreyfus to have a trouble-free car with a chance of winning the race. World record holder Sir Malcolm Campbell brought along a 1926 4-liter V12 re-bodied 2-seat Sunbeam racecar, which produced 306 hp. Sir Henry (Tim) Birkin, was expected to enter his stripped down 4˝-liter Bentley with a four-seater touring body, but neither car nor driver appeared. Juan Zanelli with an Alfa Romeo Monza was entered but did not show up. Austrian Charly Jellen was an early entry as was Italian Tazio Nuvolari but neither appeared for the race.
Practice:
Due to the high speeds that were attained at the Avusrennen, great demands were made on the tires. The year before several drivers had been forced to change their tires during the race and lost much time because the tires did not last the distance. Therefore the Avus track had been opened several times during the weeks before the 1932 race for test drives. Hans Stuck with his 7.1-liter Mercedes-Benz undertook tire tests on May 9 that turned out relatively satisfactory. Less favorable results showed up during some drives with the Bugatti of Divo, who undertook tire tests for his teammates Varzi and Chiron. In one case a rear tire lasted just one lap. Teams were determined that the results of the race would not depend on failing tires.
      AUTOMOBIL-REVUE reported that Hans Stuck with his Mercedes-Benz SSKL was successful during test drives before official practice, establishing a new Avus lap record in the fantastic time of 5m37s, an 209.1 km/h average speed, despite the fact that the track was not barricaded off and private cars were on the track. The previous record of 5m59s (196.3 km/h) had been put up by Caracciola with a Mercedes-Benz in 1931.
      On Thursday morning, the first official practice day, Divo also was able to do some fast laps in the 5-liter factory Bugatti, capable of 260 km/h or better top speed. His best lap was at an outstanding 214 km/h, which was a new unofficial lap record. During the practice days many spectators were in attendance and displayed great interest in the proceedings. To their dismay only few drivers participated in Thursday's practice. Caracciola made some fast laps with his new Alfa Romeo, then pursued the streamlined 7.1-liter Mercedes-Benz SSKL of Manfred von Brauchitsch. A few of the small cars buzzed speedily around the track, to be followed by some of the big cars in the afternoon. Chiron appeared and was greeted cheerfully. Later everybody crowded around the British racing green Sunbeam Tiger of Campbell as it was pushed to the start. After the first lap he stopped and critically examined the car.
      Friday was considerably busier. The Maserati team appeared early in the morning and put up several remarkable lap times, the fastest achieved by Dreyfus unofficially in 5m29s, a speed of 214.3 km/h. The Berlin daily "BZ am Mittag" reported that after only one lap by Dreyfus one of the tires had thrown a thread. It was suggested that they should change to Continentals. The Bugatti team had speedily ordered per telex special Dunlop tires from England, which were to arrive by plane. Temporarily, they had received a few of these tires from Caracciola, who had ordered them before, but had decided to use Continentals instead. Then Varzi and Chiron had these tires mounted not to the 5-liter Bugattis but to the smaller 2.3-liter cars. On Chiron's car they lasted ten laps. Consequently the Bugatti team felt inclined to race with the smaller cars instead of the 5-liter types and hesitated about which car to use before scrutiny on Saturday. The special Continental tires used at the previous Avusrennen sufficed the demands of 1931 when Caracciola drove the fastest lap at 196.3 km/h. But now lap speeds had climbed to 215 km/h, an increase of 10%. Last year's tires could not handle that speed. Varzi drove some laps and reached 5m28s with the 5-liter Bugatti, a speed of almost 215 km/h. For several laps Caracciola tried also a red Alfa Romeo Monza, which had arrived by truck during Friday's practice. He did not yet know whether he would start with the white or the red car. Then Stuck drove his SSKL for several laps and so did Stuber in his Bugatti. Later Campbell and Caracciola drove a few laps. The air was filled for hours with the droning and screaming of the engines. During a pause the motorcycle world record holder Ernst Henne established two new world records for 750- and 1000 cc motorcycles at 218.7 km/h.
Race:
The International Avusrennen on Sunday was a major event for the people of Berlin and had been well promoted by the local press. After some warm days a slight rain shower came down Sunday morning. It was a cool day with cloud cover and a slight wind blowing. The drivers were most pleased with the weather not only for the engines but more so to keep the tire temperatures down. At the time of the start, the grandstands were tightly packed and along the entire course a gigantic crowd of over 200,000 spectators shoved their way. (MOTOR UND SPORT reported 150,000 to 160,000 paying spectators plus 50,000 non-paying onlookers but inflated figures of 250,000 and even 300,000 were also published. The ADAC Amtliche Mitteilungen reported that 83,000 tickets were sold for 210,000 RM. The cost for the Avusrennen was 205,000 RM, leaving a moderate 5,000 RM profit for the Club.)
      The spectators greatly regretted the non-appearance of Louis Chiron and Achille Varzi. Although they had practiced with the factory cars, they did not show up for the start. Not only had both drivers entered at the Avusrennen but they had also submitted entries on the same day for the Grand Prix of Casablanca in Morocco. A protest had been lodged against their start in Berlin because double entries were not admissible. In order not to receive a disqualification, both drivers were not allowed to start. Divo in a 5-liter Bugatti T54 replaced Chiron and Bouriat drove for Varzi in a 2.3-liter T51 instead of the big Bugatti.
      The event opened at 1:30 in the afternoon with a renewed record attempt by Henne on his BMW motorcycle. Despite a head-wind the rider was again able to establish a new international record over 5 km in both directions on his 500 cc BMW at a speed of 198.15 km/h. Shortly thereafter the 20 small cars started in the 10-lap overture of the Avusrennen, which was won by Earl Howe in his Delage. Finally the big cars lined up to the order of lots drawn.
Pole Position
46
Divo

Bugatti

33
Caracciola

Alfa Romeo

32
von Morgen

Bugatti

36
"Williams"

Bugatti

31
von Brauchitsch

Mercedes-Benz

40
Dreyfus

Maserati

47
Bouriat

Bugatti

39
Campbell

Sunbeam

37
zu Leiningen

Bugatti

43
Stuck

Mercedes-Benz

41
Fagioli

Maserati

48
Hartmann

Bugatti

42
Stuber

Bugatti

34
Kotte

Maserati

44
Lewy

Bugatti

38
Lobkowicz

Bugatti

At the start Divo in the 5-liter Bugatti and Dreyfus in the 16-cylinder Maserati were fighting for the lead while "Williams", Fagioli, Caracciola and von Morgen followed some distance behind. After a few minutes when the cars returned to the start and finish at incredible speed, Dreyfus with his 16-cylinder Maserati was in the lead with a starting lap of 6m03.6s at 202 km/h, followed closely by Divo in the 5-liter Bugatti and 11 seconds behind was Bouriat's 2.3-liter Bugatti. Von Morgen stopped at his pit, as did Fagioli and Hartmann. Prinz zu Leiningen retired his Bugatti with a supercharger problem.
      After the first lap the loudspeakers announced a serious accident. The Bugatti of the Czechoslovakian Prince Lobkowicz had left the track just before the South Loop. B. von Lengerke in MOTOR UND SPORT reported: "The regrettable accident happened at kilometer 7.7, near the Forsthaus where cars approached normally from the left side of the track for a slight right kink before turning right for the South Loop. A close group of three cars, at right front a blue car, behind in the middle Lobkowicz and to the left Lewy, who attempted to pass Prince Lobkowicz on the left at the Havelchaussee underpass, where Lewy scraped the concrete wall with the left rear wheel hub. Prince Lobkowicz who only now noticed the passing car, gave way, but was afraid to hit the grass to the right of the track and moved again to the left, whereby he must have underestimated the speed of over 200 km/h and turned too sharply to the left. His car skidded sideways, side-slipped in its entire width across the eight meter wide grass median, made a jump and crashed tumbling onto the raised railway embankment beyond the second straight." The Freiburger Zeitung wrote that the driver was thrown onto the railroad tracks above from where he was brought immediately to the nearby Hildegard Hospital. The author Erwin Tragatsch recounted that Lobkowicz died hours later from his severe head injuries without having regained consciousness.
      Lewy instinctively had pulled his car to the left onto the grass median to avoid a collision with the out of control Lobkowicz in front of him crossing the track. Lewy briefly rolled along the second straight where Divo was approaching from the opposite side, brought his car back onto the median, then the left front wheel broke apart when the car hit a ditch. ADAC in Motorwelt wrote that wheel splinters were flying against Divo's car, which at this moment passed on the second straight coming from the South turn. Lewy who by good luck had missed Lobkowicz's car and Divo's Bugatti, Divo fortunately remained uninjured. After the first lap the cars passed the finish in this order:
1. Dreyfus (Maserati)
2. Divo (Bugatti)
3. Bouriat (Bugatti)
4. Caracciola (Alfa Romeo)
5. "Williams" (Bugatti)
6. v. Brauchitsch (Mercedes-Benz)
7. Stuber (Bugatti)
8. Campbell (Sunbeam)
9. Stuck (Mercedes-Benz)
10. v. Morgen (Bugatti)
11. Fagioli (Maserati)
12. Kotte (Maserati)
13. Hartmann (Bugatti)

After lap two Divo was leading in the big Bugatti, although the race average had now dropped to 200 km/h. After 27 seconds there followed Bouriat and Caracciola close together, then the streamlined Mercedes and von Morgen who had made up time after his pit stop. Next came Stuck, then "Williams" who stopped at his pit. Dreyfus had serious problems with a sticking throttle, Fagioli stopped for spark plugs and Hartmann retired with a damaged engine. After lap two the order was:
1. Divo (Bugatti)
2. Bouriat (Bugatti)
3. Caracciola (Alfa Romeo)
4. v. Brauchitsch (Mercedes-Benz)
5. v. Morgen (Bugatti)
6. Stuck (Mercedes-Benz)
7. "Williams" (Bugatti)
8. Stuber (Bugatti)
9. Campbell (Sunbeam)
10. Kotte (Maserati)
11. Fagioli (Maserati)
12. Dreyfus (Maserati)

On the third lap the front part of the field remained in the same order. Campbell returned from the South Loop with a heavily smoking car and retired his Sunbeam with a broken oil pipe. "Williams" and Dreyfus headed for the pits to change spark plugs and had fallen to the end of the field while Stuber stopped to get new tires. After lap three the order was:
1. Divo (Bugatti)
2. Bouriat (Bugatti)
3. Caracciola (Alfa Romeo)
4. v. Brauchitsch (Mercedes-Benz)
5. v. Morgen (Bugatti)
6. Stuck (Mercedes-Benz)
7. Stuber (Bugatti)
8. Kotte (Maserati)
9. Fagioli (Maserati)
10. "Williams" (Bugatti)
11. Dreyfus (Maserati)

At the end of lap four Bouriat had fallen from second to eighth place and slowly rolled to his pit. The engine was inspected for some time and then the car was pushed onto the center median with a broken supercharger Caracciola had now inherited second position, followed by von Brauchitsch and Stuck. Von Morgen lost time while he had his Bugatti's engine inspected and Fagioli had to stop once again for more spark plugs. After four laps the cars passed the finish in this order:
1. Divo (Bugatti)
2. Caracciola (Alfa Romeo)
3. v. Brauchitsch (Mercedes-Benz)
4. Stuck (Mercedes-Benz)
5. Stuber (Bugatti)
6. Kotte (Maserati)
7. "Williams" (Bugatti)
8. Bouriat (Bugatti)
9. Fagioli (Maserati)
10. v. Morgen (Bugatti)
11. Dreyfus (Maserati)

After five laps the race average had fallen to 199 km/h. Divo was still leading Caracciola by 40 seconds. "Williams" who had pitted early on made up a lot of time and turned one lap at 207 km/h average. Stuck brought his Mercedes in for spark plugs and lost valuable time. After five laps the order was:
1. Divo (Bugatti)
2. Caracciola (Alfa Romeo)
3. v. Brauchitsch (Mercedes-Benz)
4. Stuck (Mercedes-Benz)
5. Stuber (Bugatti)
6. "Williams" (Bugatti)
7. Kotte (Maserati)
8. Fagioli (Maserati)
9. v. Morgen (Bugatti)
10. Dreyfus (Maserati)

At the completion of lap six Caracciola's Alfa Romeo was in the lead. Close behind him followed still the young German v. Brauchitsch in his streamlined Mercedes-Benz and there was a long interval to "Williams" in third place. At the end of the sixth lap Divo, who had dictated a hellish speed, arrived at the North Turn enveloped in a cloud of smoke and stopped at his pit with a broken oil pipe. This Bugatti also ended up on the center grass median. Von Morgen who had stopped several times at his pit, retired his Bugatti because of a cracked coolant manifold on top of the engine, which had broken a few days ago, was poorly repaired and now leaked water onto the sparkplugs. The order after six laps was:
1. Caracciola (Alfa Romeo)
2. v. Brauchitsch (Mercedes-Benz)
3. "Williams" (Bugatti)
4. Stuber (Bugatti)
5. Stuck (Mercedes-Benz)
6. Kotte (Maserati)
7. Fagioli (Maserati)
8. Dreyfus (Maserati)

There were no changes on lap seven except that Stuck passed Stuber for fourth place.
1. Caracciola (Alfa Romeo)42m32.2s = 194.5 km/h
2. v. Brauchitsch (Mercedes-Benz)42m34.4s = 194.3 km/h
3. "Williams" (Bugatti)45m07.8s = 183.2 km/h
4. Stuck (Mercedes-Benz)
5. Stuber(Bugatti)
6. Kotte (Maserati)
7. Fagioli (Maserati)
8. Dreyfus (Maserati)

Münchner Neueste Nachrichten reported that on lap eight von Brauchitsch went by Caracciola and passed the finish in first place, shadowed by the Alfa Romeo. But then Caracciola took the lead again and the young German contented himself by again following closely. The fight between the two Germans, which had started on lap two, became increasingly severe. While Caracciola in the nimble Alfa Romeo always gained an advantage in the corners, the bulky Mercedes-Benz made up the lost time on the straights. At one time both Germans drove next to each other, then again behind each other and the battle raged with enormous vehemence lap after lap along the track. The spectators took very great interest in the uniquely sharp duel of the leading drivers. Von Brauchitsch was regularly informed by his pit through signs and flags, displayed by Mercedes team manager Alfred Neubauer and mechanic Willy Zimmer. After a tire replacement Dreyfus had previously gone out to establish the fastest lap of the race in 5m35.45s at 209.84 km/h and won the donated prize of 1,000 RM. In his book "My Two Lives" Dreyfus remembered: "I began having trouble with a sticking accelerator, and then the butterfly of the carburetor snapped. I pushed the enormous car several hundred yards to the pits..."After a long time Ernesto Maserati had fixed the broken throttle of the carburetor, but two laps later, on lap eight Dreyfus had to retire his Maserati with a defective carburetor throttle. "Williams", whose Bugatti lay for a long time close behind the two Germans in third place, fell back with supercharger problems. Stuber again found a way around Stuck's Mercedes and Fagioli once more had spark plugs changed on his Maserati. The order looked different after lap eight:
1. v. Brauchitsch (Mercedes-Benz)
2. Caracciola (Alfa Romeo)
3. Stuber (Bugatti)
4. Stuck (Mercedes-Benz)
5. Kotte (Maserati)
6. "Williams" (Bugatti)
7. Fagioli (Maserati)

On the ninth lap Caracciola regained first place, Williams retired with a bad supercharger and Fagioli climbed out of his Maserati with the spark plug problem still unresolved. Now only five cars were left.
1. Caracciola (Alfa Romeo)
2. v. Brauchitsch (Mercedes-Benz)
3. Stuber (Bugatti)
4. Stuck (Mercedes-Benz)
5. Kotte (Maserati)

On the tenth lap only one position changed, Stuck passed the grandstand ahead of Stuber and their battle continued.
After 11 laps the same five cars remained in the race. While Caracciola and von Brauchitsch carried on with their desperate battle for the lead, half a lap behind a similar fierce duel for third and fourth place kept going between Stuber in his Bugatti and Stuck in the Mercedes-Benz. The quick Swiss driver succeeded in freeing himself from the tough Mercedes driver on the eleventh lap, so that Stuber could place himself behind the leading pair. Stuck was no longer able to maintain his previous speed, because the oil pressure of the Mercedes' engine was too low and therefore he could not risk bringing the engine to full revolutions. Stuck had to stop once more at his pit and thereby lost even more time.
      There were no further position changes from lap 12 to 14. Caracciola and von Brauchitsch on one hand and Stuber and Stuck on the other hand, these were now the four drivers, between which the race would be decided. Caracciola was leading von Brauchitsch at the grandstand by 2 to 3 seconds, while Stuber in third place followed with a gap of several minutes. Stuck had fallen further back and obviously slowed down near the end of the race. The closer the end drew near, the stronger grew the tension, because it was still entirely uncertain who would pass the finish in first place. Could the young von Brauchitsch succeed in beating the great Caracciola?
      The last lap started with Caracciola in the lead and brought a tremendous climax to the battle. As Caracciola and von Brauchitsch left the south loop, the Alfa Romeo was still about 100 meters ahead. But the streamlined Mercedes whizzed with a speed of over 230 km/h along the straight and passed Caracciola. The silver Mercedes entered the North Turn only five seconds ahead, the last critical stumbling block. But the little white Alfa Romeo could not catch his heavy opponent and von Brauchitsch passed the finish just 3.6 seconds ahead of Caracciola. With this forced demonstration von Brauchitsch established the first noteworthy victory of his career. Enormous applause surrounded the young German. Both drivers had Continental tires mounted, which lasted brilliantly since neither driver had to undertake the generally expected tire change. Again after almost four minutes the crowd burst out in celebration when Stuber arrived as third finisher. For Stuber the race was a great success, especially since he was an independent driver who did not have the resources, equipment or preparation of a works or semi-works driver. Stuck and Kotte were the last two finishers.

Results

Pos.No.DriverEntrantCarTypeEngineLapsTime/StatusDiff

1.31Manfred von BrauchitschM. v.BrauchitschMercedes-BenzSSKL7.1S-6151h30m52.4s
2.33Rudolf CaracciolaR. CaracciolaAlfa RomeoMonza2.3S-8151h30m56.0s = 194.27 km/h
3.42Hans StuberH. StuberBugattiT512.3S-8151h34m31.4s = 186.89 km/h
4.43Hans StuckH. StuckMercedes-BenzSSKL7.1S-6151h35m11.4s = 185.58 km/h
5.34Ernst KotteE. KotteMaserati26M2.5S-8151h41m43.4s = 173.66 km/h
DNF36"Williams""Williams"BugattiT512.3S-88supercharger
DNF40René DreyfusOfficine A. MaseratiMaseratiV55.02x88carburetor throttle
DNF32Heinrich-Joachim von MorgenGerman Bugatti TeamBugattiT512.3S-85engine coolant leak
DNF46Albert DivoAutomobiles E. BugattiBugattiT545.0S-85broken oil pipe
DNF41Luigi FagioliOfficine A. MaseratiMaserati8C 28002.8S-85tires
DNF47Guy BouriatAutomobiles E. BugattiBugattiT512.3S-84engine
DNF39Malcolm CampbellSir Malcolm CampbellSunbeamTiger4.0V-122oil pipe
DNF48László HartmannL. HartmannBugattiT35B2.3S-81engine
DNF38Georg-Christian LobkowiczG. C. LobkowiczBugattiT545.0S-80fatal crash
DNF44Hans LewyPilesi Renn TeamBugattiT512.3S-80crash
DNF37Hermann zu LeiningenGerman Bugatti TeamBugattiT35C2.0S-80supercharger
Fastest lap: René Dreyfus (Maserati) in 5m35.45s = 210.06 km/h (130.5 mph)
Winner's medium speed: 194.40 km/h
Weather: overcast, cool and dry
In retrospect:
The lap record was put up by Dreyfus with the 16-cylinder Maserati in 5m35.45s at 209.84 km/h average speed. Additionally the following international records were established by Divo with the 5-liter Bugatti in the 3000-5000 cc class during the course of the Avusrennen: 50 km: at 200.6 km/h and 50 miles: at 201.1 km/h, a record previously held by Kaye Don at 199.869 km/h. During the Avusrennen von Brauchitsch placed also an international record over 200 km, which up to now had been held by Cyril Paul in a Delage, at 173.374 km/h established at Brooklands. Recognition of the German's 194.5 km/h speed for class 5000 to 8000 cc cars and Divo's new Avus records were however doubtful.

      Caracciola versus von Brauchitsch: In their summary ADAC Motorwelt wrote that the spectators and part of the press were under the impression that Caracciola, during his gigantic duel with von Brauchitsch, had hindered him from passing by not staying on the right side of the track. The accusation was however invalid. Such unsporting behavior could hardly be expected from Caracciola. Already on lap eight von Brauchitsch had passed Caracciola once to let him go again and was satisfied thereafter to follow the Alfa Romeo closely like a shadow. Von Brauchitsch's conduct was in reality the result of careful calculations by the experienced Alfred Neubauer of Daimler-Benz, who had advised his young protégé to keep constantly close behind the leading driver during the race and to get to the front at the decisive moment only, but to look after his engine until this moment arrived. Even when von Brauchitsch had once deviated from this tactic by passing Caracciola temporarily, it happened probably in the heat of the battle. But he immediately drifted behind again and passed Caracciola only on the last half of the final lap, which he could risk since his more powerful engine allowed him to do so any time.

      The streamlined Mercedes of von Brauchitsch may have looked ugly and bulky but it was quite effective. The streamlined body was built in a great hurry within two weeks as a compromise design to gain an advantage for high-speed driving. B. von Lengerke in MOTOR UND SPORT reported that the car met its objective not only by its aerodynamic form but also in connection with a longer final drive gear ratio supplied by the factory through Alfred Neubauer. In order to compare the effect of the changes that were undertaken to von Brauchitsch's SSKL, a comparison could be made with Stuck's Mercedes, which had the same SSKL chassis, however with only a streamlined tail section added. While the normal bodied SSKL of Hans Stuck was burdened with 3600 rpm, the maximum for this engine, not to be exceeded for longer stretches, the lower air resistance of the aerodynamic body on von Brauchitsch's car allowed operation at only 3000 rpm. With this considerable preservation of his engine, Brauchitsch was able to attain a higher speed on the straights, because in the corners his tough opponent Caracciola with his light and nimble Alfa Romeo had an absolute advantage.

      René Dreyfus decided that the disappointing Avusrennen was his last race for Maserati and Ernesto Maserati agreed to end their contract after the race. Louis Chiron owned two 2.3-liter Bugatti racecars and Dreyfus took an offer from Louis to drive one of those Bugatti T 51, while Chiron, who was employed by Ettore Bugatti, drove a factory Type 51. The agreement was that Dreyfus would split his prize money with Louis. The first start for Dreyfus was the following week at the Eifelrennen, where he finished second behind Caracciola's Alfa Romeo and ahead of Chiron's works Bugatti.

      Although little known outside Europe, the famous Eric Hanussen was an extraordinary stage clairvoyant during the 1920s and 1930s in Germany and Austria. Hanussen had visited the ADAC. The press had accused the ADAC, as promoter of the 1932 Avusrennen, that the death of Prince Lobkowicz was fault of the ADAC because the Club had been warned by Hanussen. In response to that allegation the ADAC released the following statement in ADAC Motorwelt:

      The fault in the death of Prince Lobkowicz: The accurate investigation, which was conducted by the ADAC experts immediately after conclusion of the race, brought no evidence that the fatal accident was caused by another driver. This was simply an unfortunate combination of circumstances, which so often is the cause of an accident.
      Much was written in connection with the death of Prince Lobkowicz and about the prophecies by Hanussen, that the death of the Prince had been foretold; and that the ADAC had been warned and had neglected to alert the racing driver. Hanussen had dictated his prophecy word for word at the Berlin ADAC main agency office:
      "The day of the International ADAC-Avusrennen of 1932 will begin in the sign of Caracciola. However the great driver in his Alfa Romeo will get probably a bit to the rear-guard due to two brief troubles and has to make room for the advancing Chiron. This time his Bugatti will deliver everything the engine has within. Likewise he will be thrown back by a brief break-down, so that for a while the race will look like a victory by Stuck with the Mercedes. In general Mercedes will dominate the field this year for an enormous stretch. Campbell with Sunbeam will drive an impressive race. He will quickly advance and then stay behind.
      "This year will be a Bugatti year. A surprise represents von Morgen. Prince Lobkowicz should drive carefully. At the race near the end Bugatti will be seen in front in the lead after hard battle, after Alfa Romeo has been caught up.
      If Chiron however does not drive until the end because of his tires, a sure victory for Alfa Romeo will happen."
      The course of the race showed that everything about the above prediction was incorrect. Solely the warning to Prince Lobkowicz referring to his driving style proved warranted. The allegation that an accident had been predicted by Mr. Hanussen, does not hold true after the above statement.

      Consecration of Prince Georg-Christian Lobkowicz. AUTOMOBIL-REVUE reported that numerous race drivers as well as representatives from the ADAC and AvD attended the ceremony for the consecration of the Czechoslovakian Prince Lobkowicz's body. The coffin, draped in the flag of the Allgemeine Deutsche Automobil-Club was then transferred to the Castle Horin near Melnik north of Prague at the Elbe River, where the somber funeral of the Prince took place. During the requiem, celebrated by the Arch-Bishop of Prague in the presence of 22 priests, several airplanes circled high in the air. After completion of the requiem the solemn funeral procession started between lanes of more than 5000 persons to the cemetery of Horin. Almost the entire high nobility of the former Austro-Hungarian monarchy was present at the wonderful funeral ceremony.

      Contradictions: In the entry lists published and also in the program some drivers were shown in different cars than in those in which they started the race. Consequently various contemporary magazines therefore mixed-up in their race reports Dreyfus and Fagioli in their different Maseratis, also Divo and Bouriat in their Bugattis. Dreyfus drove the 16-cylinder Maserati while Fagioli was steering the 8C 2800 car. In reality only Divo drove a works 5-liter Bugatti while Bouriat started in a 2.3-liter T51, which can be evidenced by pictures. "Williams" raced a Bugatti T51 but independently.

Primary sources researched for this article:
ADAC Amtliche Mitteilungen
ADAC Motorwelt, München
Allgemeine Automobil-Zeitung, Berlin
Allgemeine Automobil-Zeitung, Wien
AUTOMOBIL-REVUE, Bern
AZ - Motorwelt, Brno
BZ am Mittag, Berlin
Freiburger Zeitung, Freiburg i. Breisgau
Mercedes-Benz Archiv, Stuttgart
MOTOR, Berlin
MOTOR UND SPORT, Pössneck
Münchner Neueste Nachrichten, München
The Motor, London
Wuppertaler General Anzeiger, Wuppertal





xxxxxxxxx

II GRAND PRIX DE CASABLANCA

Anfa - Casablanca (F), 22 May 1932.
laps x km = km


No.DriverEntrantCarTypeEngine

Libre:
Philippe EtancelinP. EtancelinAlfa RomeoMonza2.3S-8
Goffredo ZehenderG. ZehenderAlfa RomeoMonza2.3S-8
Pierre FélixP. Félix Alfa RomeoMonza2.3S-8
Marcel LehouxM. LehauxBugattiT545.0S-8
Stanisłas CzaykowskiS. CzaykowskiBugattiT512.3S-8
Jean-Pierre WimilleJ-P. WimilleBugattiT512.3S-8
Jean GaupillatJ. GaupillatBugattiT512.3S-8
Benoît FalchettoB. FalchettoBugattiT35C2.0S-8
DominiciDominiciBugattiT35C2.0S-8
Guy MollG. MollBugattiT35C2.0S-8
Louis TrintignantL. TrintignantBugattiT35C2.0S-8
Charles DruckC. DruckBugattiT35C2.0S-8
Mlle "Hellé-Nice""Mlle Hellé-Nice"BugattiT35C2.0S-8DNA - did not appear
Jean de MaleplaneJ. de MaleplaneMaserati262.5S-8
1500cc:
José ScaronJ. ScaronAmilcarMC01.3?S-6
Anne-Cecile Rose-ItierMme Rose-ItierBugattiT37A1.5S-4
Emmanuel GalbaE. GalbaBugattiT37A1.5S-4
ChiquitoChiquitoBugattiT37A1.5S-4
André VagniezA. VagniezBugattiT37A1.5S-4
Henri DurandH. DurandBugattiT37A1.5S-4
MareuseMme MareuseBugattiT391.5S-8DNA - did not appear
Claude OzannatC. OzannatBugattiT391.5S-8DNA - did not appear
Louis JolyL. JolyMaserati261.5S-8
Pierre VeyronP. VeyronMaserari261.5S-8


Text.
Under Construction
-
Entries:
-
Practice:
-
Race:
-
Pole Position

Falchetto

Bugatti


Etancelin

Alfa Romeo


Wimille

Bugatti


de Maleplane

BMaserati


Zehender

Alfa Romeo


Gaupillat

Bugatti


Trintignant

Bugatti


Lehoux

Bugatti


Czaykowski

Bugatti


Druck

Bugatti


Félix

Alfa Romeo


Dominici

Bugatti


Joly

Maserati


Rose-Itier

Bugatti


Moll

Bugatti


Durand

Bugatti


Galba

Bugatti


Scaron

Amilcar


Chiquito

Bugatti


Veyron

Maserati


Vagniez

Bugatti

-

Results

Pos.No.DriverEntrantCarTypeEngineLapsTime/StatusDiff

1.Marcel LehouxM. LehauxBugattiT545.0S-8473h19m29.2s
2.Philippe EtancelinP. EtancelinAlfa RomeoMonza2.3S-8473h23m00.2s
3.Stanisłas CzaykowskiS. CzaykowskiBugattiT512.3S-8473h25m32.8s
4.Benoît FalchettoB. FalchettoBugattiT35C2.0S-8473h27m11.2s
5.Jean de MaleplaneJ. de MaleplaneMaserati262.5S-8473h41m34.4s
6.Pierre VeyronP. VeyronMaserari261.5S-8473h42m29.4s
7.Henri DurandH. DurandBugattiT37A1.5S-4473h44m05.8s
8.DominiciDominiciBugattiT35C2.0S-8473h45m52.4s
9.José ScaronJ. ScaronAmilcarMC01.3?S-6473h50m47.8s
10.Anne-Cecile Rose-ItierMme Rose-ItierBugattiT37A1.5S-4473h53m10.2s
11.Emmanuel GalbaE. GalbaBugattiT37A1.5S-4473h56m19.4s
12.ChiquitoChiquitoBugattiT37A1.5S-446
DNFLouis JolyL. JolyMaserati261.5S-8
DNFAndré VagniezA. VagniezBugattiT37A1.5S-4
DNFGuy MollG. MollBugattiT35C2.0S-8
DNFGoffredo ZehenderG. ZehenderAlfa RomeoMonza2.3S-8
DNFJean-Pierre WimilleJ-P. WimilleBugattiT512.3S-832engine
DNFPierre Félix P. Félix Alfa RomeoMonza2.3S-8
DNFLouis TrintignantL. TrintignantBugattiT35C2.0S-8
DNFCharles DruckC. DruckBugattiT35C2.0S-83
DNFJean GaupillatJ. GaupillatBugattiT512.3S-8
Fastest lap: Jean-Pierre Wimille (Bugatti) in 4m02.0s = 131.876 km/h
Winner's medium speed: 125.314 km/h
Weather:
In retrospect:
-





PREVIOUS 1932 INDEX NEXT
MAIN INDEX


© 2013 Leif Snellman, Hans Etzrodt - Last updated: 02.04.2013