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Star 16 September 1933: Eddie hall (M.G. magnette) wins the B.R.D.C. 500 Miles at Brooklands. M. B. Watson had a fatal accident as he crashed his M.G. Magnette. It landed upside down it turned into flames.



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IV MASARYKUV OKRUH

Brno (CS), 17 September 1933.
Group I: 17 laps x 29.142 km (18.108 mi) = 495.4 km (307.8 mi)
Group II: 15 laps x 29.142 km (18.108 mi) = 437.1 km (271.6 mi)


No.DriverEntrantCarTypeEngine

Group IClass over 1500 cc
2Louis ChironScuderia FerrariAlfa RomeoB/P32.6S-8
4Marcel LehouxM. LehouxBugattiT512.3S-8
6Rudolf SteinwegR. SteinwegBugattiT35C2.0S-8
8"Marko"E. MarkiewiczBugattiT512.3S-8
10László HartmannL. HartmannBugattiT512.3S-8
12Giulio AyminiG. AyminiMaserati261.5S-8DNA - did not appear
14Renato BalestreroR. BalestreroAlfa RomeoMonza2.3S-8
16Attilio BattilanaA. BattilanaBugattiT35C2.0S-8
18Manfred von BrauchitschDaimler-Benz A. G.Mercedes-BenzSSKL7.1S-6
20Paul PietschP. PietschAlfa RomeoMonza2.3S-8
22? Charly Jellen? C. JellenAlfa RomeoMonza2.3S-8DNA - did not appear
24René DreyfusAutomobiles E. BugattiBugattiT512.3S-8
26Jean-Pierre WimilleSommer-WimilleAlfa RomeoMonza2.3S-8
28Guy MollG. MollAlfa RomeoMonza2.3S-8
30? Jean Gaupillat? J. GaupillatBugattiT512.3S-8DNA - did not appear
32Jan KubičekJ. KubičekBugattiT35B2.3S-8
34Luigi FagioliScuderia FerrariAlfa RomeoB/P32.6S-8
36Antonio BrivioScuderia FerrariAlfa RomeoMonza2.6S-8
38? Walter Grosch? W. GroschAlfa RomeoMonza2.3S-8DNA - did not appear
40? Achille Varzi? A. VarziBugattiT512.3S-8DNA - did not appear
42? Eugen Bjørnstad? E. BjørnstadAlfa RomeoMonza2.3S-8DNA - did not appear
44?Tazio Nuvolari? T. NuvolariMaserati8CM3.0S-8DNA - did not appear
46Zdenek PohlV. GutBugattiT352.0S-8
Piero TaruffiP. TaruffiMaserati8CM3.0S-8DNA - did not appear
Mario U. BorzacchiniM. U. BorzacchiniMaseratihad died in Monza crash
Giuseppe CampariG. CampariMaseratihad died in Monza crash
J. ZadákJ. ZadákBugattiDNA - did not appear
 
Group IIClass up to 1500 cc
48Ernst Günther BurggallerE.-G. BurggallerBugattiT51A1.5 S-8
50? Jiri WeinfurterJ. WeinfurterBugattiT37A1.5S-4DNA - did not appear
52Karl VlašínK. VlašínZ1.1S-4
54Bruno SojkaB. SojkaBugattiT37A1.5S-4
56Guido LandiG. LandiMaserati261.5S-8
58? Louis JolyL. JolyMaserati261.5S-8DNA - did not appear
60Victor MarretV. MarretMiller911.5S-8
62Marcel BouclyM. BouclyMiller911.5S-8
64Edith FrischE. FrischBugattiT37A1.5S-4
66Jan RipperJ. RipperBugattiT37A1.5S-4
68Hans RüeschH. RüeschAlfa Romeo6C15001.5S-6
70Adolf SzczyzyckiA. SzczyzyckiBugattiT37A1.5S-4
72Louis DecaroliL. DecaroliBugattiT37A1.5S-4
74André VagniezA. VagniezMaserati261.5S-8
76Hugh Charles HamiltonH. C. HamiltonMGMidget0.8S-4
78Pierre VeyronP. VeyronBugattiT37A1.5S-4
80Jindřich KnappJ. KnappWalterJunior1.1S-4
82Vaclav TrumpešV. TrumpešZ1.1S-4
84? Franz HošfálekF HošfálekZ1.1S-4DNS - did not start
86Gustav KremlG. KremlWikov1.5S-4
-Bernhard KandlAmilcar1.1DNA - did not appear
-Rudi HungerBugattiT37A1.5S-4DNA - did not appear
-Hugo WinterBugattiT37A1.5S-4DNA - did not appear
With only limited information on hand at the time of this writing, it was impossible for Group I cars to pair up the correct driver with starting numbers 22, 30, 38, 40, 42 and 44. The same situation affected Group II cars, where three drivers could not be matched with the correct race numbers 50, 58 and 84. Another three drivers, Kandl, Hunger and Winter entered for this race but received no race numbers. Those numbers with a question mark were assigned their drivers randomly and cannot be proven to be correct.


Chiron's third victory at the Masaryk Circuit
by Hans Etzrodt
The fourth international race at the Masaryk circuit attracted entries from almost all of the top drivers. After the Monza tragedy the prior weekend, some cancellations came in and other drivers just did not appear, leaving a field of only 16 cars. Chiron held the lead from the first to last lap on a very wet and slippery circuit, causing the challenging drivers Pietsch and Moll to crash while the retirements of Steinweg, Lehoux and von Brauchitsch were caused by mechanical problems. Eight cars survived, led by Chiron and Fagioli in the superior Alfa Romeo monopostos followed by Wimille in an Alfa Monza. The Bugattis of Dreyfus, Hartmann, Pohl and Kubiček finished in fourth to seventh places with the Alfa Monza of Balestrero in eighth.
      The 17 small machines up to 1500 cc raced simultaneously with the grand prix cars, but had their own separate battle. Burggaller (Bugatti) dominated till a fuel stop on lap eight when Landi (Maserati) took the lead. After Landi and Hamilton (MG) crashed, Burggaller regained the lead and finished first ahead of Sojka, Rüesch and Knapp. Due to the slippery circuit there were many crashes including eight injured drivers.
The CAMS or Ceskoslovensky Automobilovy Klub pro Moravu a Slezsko (Czechoslovakian Automobile Club for Moravia and Silesia) organized their fourth international automobile race on the Masarykův okruh (Masaryk Circuit). Within the short time of three years the race had grown in European significance and this year once again received entries from the best international drivers. The rather difficult 29.142 km circuit just outside the boundary of Brno went counterclockwise along Czechoslovakian state and district roads, comprising 36 left-hand corners and 47 to the right. It had a maximum incline of 7% and a maximum decline of 9.5%. The first 18 km to the village of Ostrovačice were formed primarily of winding, hilly and rather narrow district roads. This section was rich in ascents and descents, leading through the four villages of Nový Lískovec, Pisárky outside Brno, Kohoutovice, Žebětin and its wonderful forested areas. From Ostrovačice the circuit turned back and the last 11 km were almost all straight state roads past Popuvky, Veselka and Bosonohy. They allowed driving at top speed except for a rather annoying stretch of a few kilometers at Iglau, which contained structural faults consisting of long waves in the road surface, which made it impossible to drive at top speed. The general condition of the circuit was about the same as the year before with spot road repairs carried out for the race, which would not prevent further decay.
      The race cars were divided into group I for cars over 1500 cc and group II up to 1500 cc. The group I cars had to complete 17 laps or 495.414 km, while the smaller cars had to do only 15 laps or 437.130 km. The overall winner was to receive the challenge trophy that was named after the Czechoslovakian Republic's first Minister-President, Thomas Garrigue Masaryk plus the prize money of 80,000 CSK (Koruny), the second 40,000, and the third 20,000, plus a golden badge for each of the first three. Additionally there were prizes for the first three in group II of 15,000, 10,000, 5.000 CSK, plus a silver badge for each. For the fastest lap in each group the J. A. Bata Tire Company in Zlin awarded a monetary prize of 5,000 CSK. A few days before the race, this company placed 140,000 Koruny total prize money as reward for achievements on their tires. The best car of group I on Bata tires would receive 100,000 CSK and 20,000 CSK for the best Czech driver. From the small cars, the first on Bata tires received 15,000 CSK and the best Czech driver 5,000 CSK. The Czech drivers impulsively raced Bata tires and especially the Czech group II drivers, racing cars up to 1500 cc, had no contracts with other tire companies. Most drivers from group I and even Scuderia Ferrari had existing tire contracts and could not change within a few days.
      The regulations of the event demanded that in each group the race would end when a car crossed the line after its class winner had completed the race. The car would then be flagged off. Cars that were more than two laps behind the group winner would not be classified. This sensible new provision was to stop the boring and from spectators hardly noticed completion of laps by those cars way behind the leaders. This regulation would assure also that the race would end a few minutes after the winners of each group had finished their race. In case of a jumped start, a three-minute penalty would be added to the total time for every second gained at a jumped start.
Entries:
In Group I there were 11 Bugatti entries, of which René Dreyfus was the only one from Molsheim. This was also the last time that the factory entered the outmoded 2.3-liter Type 51. Marcel Lehoux and Jean Gaupillat were two further T51 entries from France while Achille Varzi and Attilio Battilana came from Italy. Edgard Markiewicz, who started under the pseudonym "Marko", was from Switzerland and had previously raced his Bugatti at the Belgian Grand Prix. The German Rudolf Steinweg entered his 2.0-liter Bugatti T35C, which was the winning car of the 1930 Masaryk race, purchased from Prinz zu Leiningen. Local driver Zdenek Pohl came from Prague and was probably the best active Czech driver in 1933. His Bugatti was supposedly a 2.0-liter T35 entered by Valdemar Gut who had been racing since the twenties. Jan Kubiček and J. Zadák were also Czech Bugatti entries while László Hartmann came from Hungary.
      The Bugattis were opposed by ten Alfa Romeos, of which two Tipo B cars came from Scuderia Ferrari for Luigi Fagioli, Louis Chiron and a 2.6-liter type Monza for Antonio Brivio. The remaining seven Alfas were 2.3-liter Monzas, all private entries, by Renato Balestrero, Jean-Pierre Wimille, Guy Moll, Eugen Bjřrnstad, Paul Pietsch, Charly Jellen and Walter Grosch.
      There were also five independent Maserati entries from Tazio Nuvolari, Piero Taruffi, Giuseppe Campari, Mario Umberto Borzacchini and Giulio Aymini. A single 7.1-liter Mercedes-Benz SSKL was entered by Daimler-Benz for Manfred von Brauchitsch which was probably the very last entry for this type.
      The Group II cars received 23 entries as shown above. Walter, Vikov and Z were three lesser known names outside of Czechoslovakia. The Walter factory in Prague manufactured motorcycles, automobiles, and aero-engines. The type entered here was probably the 4-cylinder 1.4-liter Junior possibly bored to 1.5. Wikov was a small car manufacturer from Prostějov. The type which arrived here was probably based on their 1.5-liter sports car. "Z" stood for Zbrojovka, a formerly large armaments factory in Brno, which after WW I produced small touring cars with 2-stroke engines. The cars entered were most likely race models with a 1096cc 4-cylinder supercharged 2-stroke engines.
Practice:
Prager Tageblatt reported that on Wednesday, the first day of practice, Burggaller and Pietsch were already present but did not participate in practice since their cars had not yet arrived. Brauchitsch with the large Mercedes thought the circuit to be first class, but at certain sections the road was too narrow for his large, heavy and long car. He drove his first lap in 15 minutes, a speed of 117 km/h. Steinweg and Pohl had already completed some laps, similarly Hošfálek and Trumpeš in their "Z" cars. The Swiss Rüesch (Alfa Romeo) and Veyron (Bugatti) were quite quick and so was the only woman driver, Edith Frisch (Bugatti) from Germany, who showed her skill in 18 to 19 minutes per lap. The new Miller cars of the French drivers Marret and Boucly attracted attention. The British driver Hamilton with the 750 cc MG Midget was optimistic but had tire problems. He considered the French Veyron and German Burggaller, both Bugatti drivers, as his main rivals. The Italian Landi in a Maserati could also pose a threat.
      During Thursday morning practice von Brauchitsch (Mercedes) and Lehoux (Bugatti) drove a lap in15m10s. The afternoon practice suffered at times from rain, which made driving difficult and did not allow for high speeds. Despite that, many drivers took part. One could see Pohl, Kubiček, Burggaller, Dreyfus, Soyka, Veyron, Brauchitsch, Pietsch, Moll and Hamilton practicing on the circuit. All drivers drove very carefully in this wet practice, which proceeded without any accidents. Due to the low speeds, practice was stopped prematurely. Chiron had arrived in Brno. There were about 15,000 spectators attending the proceedings.
      Friday practice took place under mostly sunny skies but with cool and occasionally stormy weather, which allowed the 31 drivers to drive at higher speeds. The best time was made by Fagioli (Alfa Romeo) in 14m26s according to unofficial time keeping. Brauchitsch did not improve on Thursday's time. Dreyfus took 15m58s in his Bugatti. The spectators' favorites were Chiron with his Alfa Romeo and the German Edith Frisch (Bugatti), who were always loudly applauded. The young Algerian driver Moll and Frenchman Wimille were putting down a lot of laps. In the small class Hamilton in the MG Midget improved his time by 20 seconds. Bastaglioni was to replace the Italian Aymini (Maserati).
      On Saturday from 8 till 10 scrutinizing took place. Varzi's car had arrived but it was questionable if he would start since he had become ill with an eye ailment. In the eventuality that Varzi would not be driving, Dreyfus would take his place. It was uncertain whether Nuvolari and Taruffi, the replacement for the unfortunate Borzacchini, would start as neither had yet arrived in Brno. But everyone was hoping for their participation. The race management would have given them the opportunity to practice had they arrived on Saturday, but later on they had sent word that they could not come. Louis Chiron, who had won here in 1931 and 1932 driving a Bugatti, was looked upon as the great favorite in the Alfa Romeo monoposto. In addition to Nuvolari and Taruffi Varzi was also missing.
Race:
It was hoped that all the cars on the entry list would arrive for the race, but 11 cars did not appear. None of the five Maseratis showed up. Campari and Borzacchini were both killed in the Monza crash the weekend before and Nuvolari and Taruffi could not adhere to their planned schedule of racing in Czechoslovakia and the following weekend in Spain. Giulio Aymini did not appear with his Maserati. Among the Alfa Romeo drivers Jellen, Grosch and Bjřrnstad did not arrive. Of the three Bugatti drivers who did not appear, it was reported that Varzi was sick, while Gaupillat and local driver Zadák did not appear.
      Since Sunday midnight it had rained very softly but continuously until around noon, soaking the entire surroundings and the race circuit. Because spectators had to use the circuit to approach their viewing points, they trailed clay and mud from fields and paths joining the track, which consequently made the circuit dangerously slippery in places. According to the organizing Club supposedly 220,000 tickets had been sold while over 100,000 spectators had visited with certainty. The loudspeakers announced in Czech and German. At 10:30 AM the large cars started for 17 laps in the following order:
Pole Position
2
Chiron

Alfa Romeo

4
Lehoux

Bugatti

6
Steinweg

Bugatti

8
"Marko"

Bugatti

10
Hartmann

Bugatti

14
Balestrero

Alfa Romeo

16
Battilana

Bugatti

18
von Brauchitsch

Mercedes-Benz

20
Pietsch

Alfa Romeo

24
Dreyfus

Bugatti

26
Wimille

Alfa Romeo

28
Moll

Alfa Romeo

32
Kubiček

Bugatti

34
Fagioli

Alfa Romeo

36
Brivio

Alfa Romeo

46
Pohl

Bugatti

Five minutes later the 17 cars of group II, up to 1500 cc, were sent away over 15 laps, thus 33 racing cars were chasing around the circuit simultaneously. The progress of the small cars is described at the end of this report.
      At the end of the first lap, Chiron arrived with an advantage of more than a minute. For an entire lap Lehoux, who was in second place, had held up Pietsch, Hartmann, Steinweg and Brauchitsch who were chasing closely behind, unable to get by. Dreyfus arrived next but stopped at the pits and fell to last place. Next were Moll, Balestrero, Wimille, Pohl, Kubiček, Fagioli who stopped at his pits for spark plugs and then Brivio. "Marko" had already retired with engine damage. After a long pause Battilana appeared and stopped at his pit to retire with a dragging exhaust pipe, which had come loose at Zebetin. As was learned later, Chiron had already established an advantage of 41 seconds after only kilometer 3.6 at the village of Pisarky. Lehoux, in second place, had continuously driven in the middle of the road during lap one, preventing the following cars from passing. What made the circuit so dangerous was that it was extremely narrow at most places, so narrow that passing another car was almost impossible. And then there was the clay soil. This clay was flushed by the rain onto the road and made the wet track even more slippery in places.
      On lap two the German Pietsch managed to force his way past Lehoux who was followed by Moll. Pietsch appeared to drive quite fast but was not quick enough to catch Chiron, who was two minutes ahead of the German. After the second lap Brauchitsch had a rather long pit stop because of a leaking tank cover. His ride became desperate and he gave the impression of helplessness in his huge car on the road. During the third lap Steinweg retired with a broken driveshaft, which caused his car to fall into a road ditch but he was not injured. Because of the wet conditions, the best lap times remained around 18 minutes. On the fourth lap Chiron lapped in 18m02.5s, while Pietsch already drove below 18 minutes. Lehoux ceased to be a problem to his pursuers when it was announced on the fourth lap that he had retired with gearbox problems.
      After five laps Chiron led Pietsch, Moll and Hartmann who was now in fourth place. He was followed by Pohl, Kubiček, Fagioli, Wimille, Dreyfus, Brauchitsch and Balestrero. Von Brauchitsch was disappointing and so was Dreyfus, who had to stop at the pits every other lap. Fagioli had to stop for the third time at his pits, although only very briefly. Brivio retired on lap five. On lap six Chiron led Pietsch and Moll, while the fast driving Pohl passed Hartmann into fourth place.
      The rain had stopped around mid-race and the cars were going faster on a drying circuit. However the roads of the forested Zebetin area would not dry and drivers still had to confront treacherous conditions there. The lap times had come down to just over 17 minutes per lap. After the ninth lap Chiron came into his pit to replenish fuel. This took 52 seconds and his advantage over Pietsch shrank to less than half a minute. Pietsch tried to close on Chiron, who was kept informed by his pit. He accelerated on the drying circuit and for the first time completed a lap in 17 minutes. Fagioli, who had been near the end of the field, was now starting to catch up. Brauchitsch retired on lap nine while in a hopeless position with mud blocking fuel lines, causing engine problems.
      Pietsch was trying to keep up with Chiron but had a crash on lap ten. His Alfa skidded at Kohoutovice, spun round and then overturned twice into a road ditch. The German was thrown out, covered in dirt; he got up and lit a cigarette. With only slight abrasions the lucky man was standing next to his badly dented Alfa. The order was now Chiron, Moll, Fagioli, Pohl and Hartmann. Wimille battled for many laps with Zdenek Pohl, both in T51 Bugattis. But when Pohl stopped to fix some trouble on his car, he fell back to sixth place behind Hartmann.
      Moll, in second place since lap ten, chased after Chiron but then crashed his car on lap 11 when he spun into a fence before Pisarky, collected a mileage marker, ended up in a ditch and was thrown out of the car. Luckily Moll only suffered a slight injury to his knee. This moved Fagioli into second spot. In these last laps Fagioli was the swiftest driver and had reduced Chiron's advantage. He also established the fastest lap of the race at 15m21.0s.
      The race ended after 4h50m22.8s with Chiron the winner, almost four minutes ahead of Fagioli. Wimille finished in third place, another seven minutes further back. Dreyfus, Hartmann and Pohl completed their seventeenth lap, while the already lapped Kubiček and Balestrero in seventh and eighth place were flagged off.
Group II:
Five minutes after the large cars had started the 17 small cars were flagged away over 15 laps. Their starting grid was also arranged in numerical order with the German Burggaller (Bugatti) at the left front, next to him Vlašín (Z), behind them Sojka (Bugatti), in row three Landi and Marret, then Boucly, Frisch, Ripper, Rüesch, Szczyzycki, Decaroli, Vagniez, Hamilton, Veyron, Knapp, Trumpeš and Kreml.
      Burggaller immediately took the lead ahead of Sojka, Landi, Vlašín and Rüesch. On lap three, Marret left the road and crashed his Miller into a road ditch. During the next laps, Burggaller (Bugatti), Landi (Maserati) and Hamilton in the little MG formed the leading group with a gap to the rest of the field. Vlašín (Z) left the road driving into a standing group of spectators, who quick-wittedly scattered apart so that no one got injured. Boucly (Miller) hit a warning sign and Decaroli crashed his Bugatti into a tree. Edith Frisch spun her Bugatti twice at the same corner going into the sand-bags. At the second time around she hit her jaw against the steering wheel and retired with a painful injury.
      On lap eight the leaders, headed by the German Burggaller, stopped at the pits to refuel. Hamilton was able to leave a few seconds before the German and chased after Landi who had not stopped his Maserati and had passed them during their fuel stop. Burggaller lost valuable minutes in the pits with a clutch problem on his Bugatti and fell back to third position. The excellently driving Hamilton spun his MG out of the concrete turn at Ostrovacice, his car somersaulting three times and ending on top of its driver. The unconscious Hamilton was released from his seatbelt (He was a Brooklands driver and they used them there due to the very bumpy surface.) and brought to Brno hospital with broken ribs, pleura and damaged kidney. Although a very serious condition, it was not life threatening. Nonetheless, some press reports declared Hamilton for dead and even included an obituary. A short time later Landi's Maserati lost adhesion in a turn and hit a tree. The Italian was dragged out of his car and brought to hospital with a double fractured femur. After lap 12, with his rivals gone, Burggaller found himself once more in first place, which he never lost. Sojka in another Bugatti finished second, followed by Rüesch (Alfa Romeo) and Knapp (Walter). Veyron (Bugatti) crashed on the 14th lap but was classified since he had completed 13 laps, the requirement to be classified in this race over 15 laps. Trumpeš (Z), who was two laps behind, was flagged off but qualified in sixth place.

Results

Pos.No.DriverEntrantCarTypeEngineLapsTime/StatusDiff

Group I:
1.2Louis ChironScuderia FerrariAlfa RomeoB/P32.6S-8174h50m22.8s
2.34Luigi FagioliScuderia FerrariAlfa RomeoB/P32.6S-8174h54m00.8s+ 3m38.0s
3.26Jean-Pierre WimilleR. Sommer & J-P. WimilleAlfa RomeoMonza2.3S-8175h00m49.0s+ 10m26.2s
4.24René DreyfusAutomobiles E. BugattiBugattiT512.3S-8175h02m52.8s+ 12m30.0s
5.10László HartmannL. HartmannBugattiT512.3S-8175h05m09.5s+ 14m46.7s
6.46Zdenek PohlV. GutBugattiT352.0S-8175h05m12.7s+ 14m49.9s
7.32Jan KubičekJ. KubičekBugattiT35B2.3S-8164h55m07.8s
8.14Renato BalestreroR. BalestreroAlfa RomeoMonza2.3S-8155h03m06.8s
DNF28Guy MollG. MollAlfa RomeoMonza2.3S-810crash
DNF20Paul PietschP. PietschAlfa RomeoMonza2.3S-89crash
DNF18Manfred von BrauchitschDaimler-Benz A. G.Mercedes-BenzSSKL7.1S-68fuel supply
DNF4Marcel LehouxM. LehouxBugattiT512.3S-84transmission
DNF36Antonio BrivioScuderia FerrariAlfa RomeoMonza2.6S-84
DNF6Rudolf SteinwegR. SteinwegBugattiT35C2.0S-82driveshaft/crash
DNF16Attilio BattilanaA. BattilanaBugattiT35C2.0S-81broken exhaust
DNF8"Marko"E. MarkiewiczBugattiT512.3S-80engine
Fastest lap: Luigi Fagioli (Alfa Romeo) in 15m21s = 113.9 km/h (70.8 mph)
Winner's medium speed: 102.37 km/h (63.6 mph)
Group II:
1.48Ernst Günther BurggallerE.-G. BurggallerBugattiT51A1.5S-8154h32m50.1s 
2.54Bruno SojkaB. SojkaBugattiT37A1.5S-4154h42m14.0s+ 9m23.9s
3.68Hans RüeschH. RüeschAlfa Romeo6C15001.5S-6154h42m27.8s+ 9m37.7s
4.80Jindřich KnappJ. KnappWalterJunior1.5S-4154h42m48.4s+ 9m58.3s
5.78Pierre VeyronP. VeyronBugattiT37A1.5S-4134h49m14.7s 
6.82Vaclav TrumpešV. TrumpešZ1.1S-4134h51m51.2s 
DNF66Jan RipperJ. RipperBugattiT37A1.5S-411?Oil pump 
DNF74André VagniezA. VagniezMaserati261.5S-810?crash 
DNF56Guido LandiG. LandiMaserati261.5S-810?crash 
DNF 76Hugh Charles HamiltonH. C. HamiltonMGMidget0.8S-49?crash 
DNF86Gustav KremlG. KremlWikov1.5S-48?mechanical
DNF70Adolf SzczyzyckiA. SzczyzyckiBugattiT37A1.5S-47?mechanical
DNF72Louis DecaroliL. DecaroliBugattiT37A1.5S-44+crash 
DNF64Edith FrischE. FrischBugattiT37A1.5S-44crash, resigned with head injury
DNF62Marcel BouclyM. BouclyMiller911.5S-83?crash 
DNF52Karl VlašínK. VlašínZ1.1S-43?crash 
DNF60Victor MarretV. MarretMiller911.5S-82crash 
Fastest lap: Fastest lap: Guido Landi (Maserati) in 17m01.6s = 102.7 km/h (63.8 mph)
Winner's medium speed: 96.1 km/h (59.7 km/h)
Weather: rain in first part of race then dry but partially wet circuit in the forests.
In retrospect:
Louis Chiron received 86,000 CSK (Koruny) for his win, including special prizes. Zdenek Pohl in sixth place collected 133,000 CSK for the fastest driver on Bata tires and for being the first Czech driver to finish, plus 13,000 CSK. for several other prizes. That the sixth place driver received more money than the victor was noted with great concern because most money should for obvious reasons go to the winner.
      Due to the continuing rain in the first half of the race, Louis Chiron took 4h50m22.8s to complete the 17 laps, which almost reached the maximum allowable time of five hours. In 1932, also on a wet circuit, he had finished the same distance with a slower Bugatti in 4h37m29.7s and in 1931 on a dry circuit his time was 4h12m07.46s.





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© 2013 Leif Snellman, Hans Etzrodt - Last updated: 04.04.2013