5. INTERTEXTUALITY AND THE METAPHYSICS OF LINKS


According to Genette's rather restricted definition intertextuality is "a relationship of copresence between two texts or among several texts." This includes the practices of quotation, allusion and plagiarism. To be able to begin at all we should free ourselves from the metaphysics of links, that is, from the famous convergence or embodiment hypothesis. Obviously, links can be used to make explicit references and transclusions will work as direct quotations, if for some obscure reason we wish merely to foreground, emphasize or boost the traditional notions of intertextuality. However, it should be equally obvious that although links have been too often confused with intertextuality, there are both intertextual relations that cannot be shown by links, and various uses of links that have nothing whatsoever to do with traditional intertextuality. This is most of all due to the fact that every traditional notion of inter- and transtextuality is ultimately dependent on the interpretative skills of readers.

The links between on-line hypertexts are something completely different, that is, these concrete connections form a new set of relations between texts as they are not merely interpretative. Unlike their distant print relatives these relations can be timed, changed, conditioned, chained, concealed, randomized, or layered etc. We may also establish only a set of connections and let the texts arrive later to fill this empty structure, and refer to real time or future unfolding of events in various media. None of these practices can be repeated in print.


1. INTRODUCTION: TRANSTEXTUALITY MEETS CYBERTEXTUALITY


2. ARCHITEXTUALITY AND METAMEDIA


3. TO COMMENT OR TO COMMAND: METATEXTUALITY AND THE PROGRAMMABLE PERFORMATIVE POWER(S)


4. PARATEXTS: TO SERVE AND TO PROTECT


6. HYPERTEXTUALITY AND THE TRULY TRANSTEXTUAL MACHINES


7. FROM CYBERTEXT TO CYBERTEXT AND BACK AGAIN

8. REFERENCES